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  • Study in UK

    The UK has been welcoming international students to its universities and colleges for many years. In 2008, there were around 1.8 million full-time undergraduate students in higher education, of which over 100,00 were international students.

    Many institutions have international open days, international offices, international student clubs and societies, planned social events, advisers and counsellors to help support you during your time as an undergraduate in the UK.

  • Study in UK

    The UK has been welcoming international students to its universities and colleges for many years. In 2008, there were around 1.8 million full-time undergraduate students in higher education, of which over 100,00 were international students.

    Many institutions have international open days, international offices, international student clubs and societies, planned social events, advisers and counsellors to help support you during your time as an undergraduate in the UK.

  • Study in UK

    The UK has been welcoming international students to its universities and colleges for many years. In 2008, there were around 1.8 million full-time undergraduate students in higher education, of which over 100,00 were international students.

    Many institutions have international open days, international offices, international student clubs and societies, planned social events, advisers and counsellors to help support you during your time as an undergraduate in the UK.

STUDY IN UNITED KINGDOM - UK

The UK has been welcoming international students to its universities and colleges for many years. In 2008, there were around 1.8 million full-time undergraduate students in higher education, of which over 100,00 were international students.

Many institutions have international open days, international offices, international student clubs and societies, planned social events, advisers and counsellors to help support you during your time as an undergraduate in the UK.

Each year, more and more international students from over 180 different countries are choosing to pursue their higher education in a UK university or college. Below we outline some of the reasons they decide to study here.

Value for Money

Undergraduate and postgraduate courses in the UK are generally much shorter than those abroad, which helps to reduce the amount of money you will end up paying in tuition fees and living costs.

Most undergraduate courses take three years to complete, although in Scotland it would be typically four years. A postgraduate Masters course will normally only take 1 year, whereas PhD will take 3 or 4 years.

Excellent international reputation

The quality of UK education is internationally recognised by employers, universities and governments, making it a popular choice for many international students.The UK is also renowned for the excellence of its research and teaching.

Good quality of education

The quality of a university's or college’s teaching and its general facilities are assessed by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA). Research standards are examined by the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), which publishes its findings every five years.

The results of all these assessments are freely available on the internet. Information on quality assurance and assessments is also available from the Higher Education Funding Councils.

International tradition

The UK has always welcomed students from all over the world. In 2006/2007, there were 239,210 international students in the UK at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

UK universities are used to looking after the welfare of non-UK students and have well-developed support services and social networks on campus.

Business language

Studying in the UK offers a great opportunity to improve your knowledge of the English language – speaking English fluently is a vital skill to have if you are considering entering the international business world.

As the UK is a member of the EU, studying here can give you a valuable insight to how the European market operates.

The UK is full of many different cultures and people, another reason why international students are interested in coming to study here. With big cities, rural towns and villages, modern and historical architecture, the UK is a diverse and exciting place to explore.

For further information on studying in Britain you may visit our office and meet our counselor.

How To Apply

For admission and enquiries relating to the United Kingdom Education and visa processing, please visit our office and meet one of our counselor.

Here is some advice to help with your course application.

Step 1: Choosing Your Course and Education Provider

Step 2: Applying

Step 3: Processing of Your Application

Step 4: Accepting Offer

Step 5: Preparing for Your Departure

Think about which courses you are interested in, and if they will lead into your chosen career. Carefully research courses, institutions and their locations. Consider the areas of specialisation offered through different courses, and which specialisations will best suit your intended career path. Once you have decided on the best course, you need to find out which education providers offer it, and which provider best suits your requirements. You might like to consider the size of the campus, the available facilities and the support services available to international students.

Step 1: Choosing your course and education provider

Think about which courses you are interested in, and if they will lead into your chosen career. Carefully research courses, institutions and their locations. Consider the areas of specialisation offered through different courses, and which specialisations will best suit your intended career path. Once you have decided on the best course, you need to find out which education providers offer it, and which provider best suits your requirements. You might like to consider the size of the campus, the available facilities and the support services available to international students.

Step 2: Applying

Once you have chosen your course and education provider, it is time to apply. Check the entrance and English language requirements to make sure you are eligible. If not, you may have to consider a different course, or even bridging or foundation study, which may increase your chances.

Contact your education provider and ask about their application requirements and application dates, as these will differ for each provider. Make a note of important deadlines and make sure you meet them. Remember to allow for postal times when sending forms by mail.

International students usually apply directly to British institutions either by post or online. You can either download application forms from institute websites or request the forms to be posted. Another option is to contact an education agent or an overseas representative of the institution to which you are applying. Your application form will ask you which course(s) you are applying for and give you details of the documentation you need to supply.

Most application forms require the following:

  • Personal details
  • Certified proof of your level of English language proficiency
  • Details of previous educational qualifications, such as academic transcripts
  • Course preferences (the course you are applying for)
  • A summary of employment experience (if applicable).

 

If you are still completing your education you can provide evidence of your most recent marks until it is possible to provide your final marks. If the documents you supply are not in English, you must provide an official certified translation. Before sending your application, check your visa requirements with your local British embassy to ensure you will qualify for a visa if your application is successful.

If at any time in the application process you are uncertain how to proceed, do not hesitate to contact your education provider or agent, they are there to help you.

Step 3: Processing of your application

Once the education provider receives your application it will be assessed and you will be notified of the result. Be prepared to be patient as it may be a few weeks (longer for postgraduate applications) before your application is processed.

Step 4: Accepting your offer

If your application is accepted you will receive a letter of offer and an acceptance form. Before accepting the offer, you should carefully read the letter of offer and check any conditions that may apply. You will have to fullfill the requirements before the institution issues a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS).

The CAS is the only accepted evidence of enrolment for processing student visa applications. You may be required to pay tuition fees before applying for the student visa. The institution will advise you of its requirements but generally it will require payment of at least one semester of course fees.

Step 5: Preparing for departure

Now that your education provider has accepted you, it is time to apply for your student visa. You must also purchase your plane tickets, organise your Overseas Student Health Cover, as well as start thinking about your accommodation in the United Kingdom. Your education provider will typically send you an admissions package, with information that will help you adjust to UK in your first couple of weeks. This might include information on your course, accommodation options, facts about the city you will live in, financial information and details about orientation programs.

Types of Education

 

What Can I Study?

You can choose from thousands of UK courses in science and technology, computing and business, art and design, social sciences, the humanities and many others. The broad range and flexible approach of the UK education system means that you're free to choose exactly what you want to study.

  1. Secondary Education in the UK
  2. Post Secondary Education in the UK
  3. Higher Education in the UK
  4. Master's Degree
  5. Doctorate
  6. International students

 

1. Secondary Education in the UK

Schools in England, Wales and Northern Ireland tend to emphasise depth in a few chosen subjects

  • Year 7 to 11 (Year 8 - 12 in N. Ireland), typically for students aged 12 to 16.
  • Some secondary schools offer a non-compulsory sixth form department, Year 12 and 13
  • After the successful completion of Year 10 and 11 a General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE)
    is awarded, usually in five to ten different subjects.

 

2. Post Secondary Education in the UK

A-Levels (England, Wales, Northern Ireland)

The most common form of post-16 education is the study of A-levels (General Certificate of Education in Advanced Level certificates), which are used as a form of preparation for admission into university. Students generally study three or four subjects to A-level relevant to their chosen degree subject.

  • Year 12 and 13, commonly called Sixth Form, typically for students from the age of 16/17 to 17/18.
  • A-Levels can be studied at a secondary school, sixth form college or further education college.

Highers (Scotland)

Generally, students take Highers, a Scottish Qualification certificate offered by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, after Secondary 4. Highers are a university entrance qualification and are offered in a wide range of subjects. Though students can typically enter university at the end of Secondary 5, most remain through Secondary 6 to take more Highers courses or progress to the Advanced Highers level.

3. Higher Education in the UK

Higher National Certificate (HNC) or Diploma (HND)

Higher national certificates and diplomas are one- and two-year career-related higher education courses, equivalent to the first stages of a degree. They are available in many areas including engineering, sports studies, art and design, media and communications and music technology. On successful completion you can enter a career at junior management level or can choose to 'top-up' to a degree by transferring to the second or third year of the degree course.

Foundation Degrees (FdA, FdSc, etc.)

Foundation degrees are two-year career-related higher education courses, which are equivalent to the first stages of a degree. They are available in areas including art and design, media and communications, engineering and hospitality management. They can be used as a good foundation for a career or as a basis to progress on to a degree course.

Diplomas of Higher Education

Diplomas of higher education are two-year courses in subject areas usually related to the social sciences, such as education, theology, communication studies and social work. They are ideal for students hoping to progress to a career in these areas and also provide a foundation for higher education courses in the same subject area.

University International Foundation Year

University International Foundation Year courses help to bridge any gaps between qualifications you hold already and the ones you need to begin a degree course at a UK university. This could be because you need to develop your English language skills, improve on your academic qualifications, or both.

Bachelor’s Degree (England, Wales, Northern Ireland)

Students apply to UK universities, through the University and College Admissions Service (UCAS), a central government agency that coordinates applications for every university. Students may make 5 choices on their UCAS form. Wide ranges of degree courses are available, which provide skills for a variety of jobs or further study.

  • A Bachelor’s degree is usually a 3 year program at a university or higher education college.
  • Universities evaluate students’ predicted A-level scores (or equivalent), among other criteria, during the admissions process
  • Students must choose course as part of the university application
  • Types of degrees include: Bachelor of Arts (BA), Bachelor of Science (BSc)
  • Some degree programs are for 4 years and include a ‘sandwich’ year when students gain relevant work experience for 1 year.
  • In countries where students have fewer than 13 years education, it is likely that students will need to study a year-long Foundation Certificate program before starting a Bachelor's degree.

 

Bachelor’s Degree (Scotland)

Wide ranges of degree courses are available at Scottish universities, which tend to emphasise breadth across subjects and students typically do not specialise subjects until the third year.

  • A Bachelor’s degree is a 4 year program at university.
  • During the admissions process universities evaluate the students’ Highers results among other criteria.
  • Students may take a sandwich course, a year of study abroad or work before courses are completed
  • Traditionally, Scottish universities award a Master of Arts (MA) degree, which is equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree
  • The Honours degree is awarded after an additional year of research at the university.

 

4. Master's Degree

A Master's degree in the UK may be research based, a taught course or a combination of the two and will prepare students for a particular career or for a doctorate qualification, and are offered in a variety of fields.

  • Requires the successful completion of an undergraduate degree.
  • Typically a 12 month program
  • Taught master's qualifications include: Master of Arts (MA), Master of Science (MSc) and Master of Business Administration (MBA)
  • Research master's qualifications include: Master of Research (MRes), Master of Philosophy (MPhil)

 

5. Doctorate

Doctorate programs require students to undertake an original piece of research.

  • Generally requires a Bachelor’s or Master's degree
  • Minimum length of three years at a university
  • Typically students work on a single research project or dissertation
  • Types of degrees: Doctor of Philosophy (PhD or DPhil)

 

International students

To study in the UK, international students whose English is not their first language must provide evidence of English language proficiency. Most universities in the UK prefer the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) certificate. IELTS 6.0+ is the usual level required for undergraduate study and IELTS 6.5+ for postgraduate.

In addition to proving English proficiency, international students must also check that their qualifications meet the school’s entry requirements, and UK NARIC provides information and advice on international qualifications. International Foundation Certificate courses are available for students that have not met required qualifications.

International students may be required to take a Pre-master’s program if their English language and study skills and qualifications do not meet the requirements to begin a Master’s degree.

Entry Requirements

Here is some advice to help with your course application.

  • English Language Skills
  • Entry requirements for UK undergraduate study
  • Entry requirements for postgraduate or MBA study
  • Entry requirements for UK independent schools
  • Entry requirements for career-based and pre-university study
  • What if you do not meet the entry requirements?

There are many different entry requirements depending on your chosen type of UK study. The great thing about studying in the UK is that even if you don’t meet the requirements for one course, you can choose another at a different level and work your way up. The UK offers a range of study options to suit international students at all levels.

English language skills

You will need a good understanding of English before you can study at most further and higher education institutions in the UK. Studying an English language course in the UK, such as English for academic purposes (EAP) or a pre-sessional course, will prepare you for further study.

Another option is to take an English test such as IELTS in your home country before you come to the UK. The International English Language Testing System (IELTS) is the world’s most popular English test. All UK institutions recognise IELTS

English language skills are a requirement for receiving an United Kindom student visa. IELTS, TOEFL, Cambridge (CAE) and Pearson (PTE) test results are accepted by the United Kingdom Border Agency (UKBA) for visa purposes.

Institutions set their own English language requirements for course entry, and the English proficiency score needed for your course may be different to the score needed to secure your visa. You should check entry requirements with your institution.

Below are the test score equivalencies:

English Language Tests for Student Visas

Test

Test Score Band

IELTS

4.0

4.5

5.0

5.5

6.0

6.5

7.0

7.5

8.0

8.5

9.0

TOEFL

31

32

35

46

60

79

94

102

110

115

118

Pearson

29

30

36

42

50

58

65

73

79

83

86

Cambridge

32

36

41

47

52

58

67

74

80

87

93

More information regarding student visa English language requirements Please visit our office and meet our counselor.

Entry requirements for UK undergraduate study

The qualifications you need depend on the course you want to study. You should have completed at least 13 years of education in your own country or in the UK, and have taken pre-university qualifications equivalent to UK A-levels, Scottish Highers or National Diplomas.

If you haven’t got these qualifications yet don’t worry – you can still study in the UK. Try searching for a career-based or pre-university course visit our office and meet our counselor to find the right course.

Example qualifications required:

HND - qualifications equivalent to one or two UK A-levels, two Scottish Highers or a Higher National Certificate or BTEC National Diploma; or an international foundation year. Plus IELTS 5.5-6.0

Foundation Degree - qualifications equivalent to one or two UK A-levels, one or two Scottish Highers or a National Diploma; or an international foundation year. Plus IELTS 5.5-6.0

Diploma of Higher Education - qualifications equivalent to one or two UK A-levels, two or three Scottish Highers or a National Diploma; or an international foundation year. Plus IELTS 5.5-6.0

Degree - qualifications equivalent to two or three UK A-levels, three or four Scottish Highers, a Higher National Certificate or Diploma, or BTEC National Diploma; or an international foundation year. Plus IELTS 6.0-6.5

Entry requirements for postgraduate or MBA study

To begin a postgraduate course in the UK, you'll need to hold an undergraduate degree from the UK or overseas. You'll be expected to have obtained a first or good 2:1 (or international equivalent) in a directly related subject and you'll need to speak English to at least IELTS 6.5 level for most courses.

Example qualifications required:

  • Pre-master's - undergraduate degree plus IELTS 5.0-5.5
  • PG Cert/PG Dip - undergraduate degree plus IELTS 6.5-7.0, or a pre-master's course
  • Master's degree - first or upper second class undergraduate degree plus IELTS 7.0, or a pre-master's course
  • MBA - first degree, 2-3 years’ business experience, plus IELTS 6.5-7.0
  • PhD - master's degree, plus IELTS 6.5-7.0

 

Entry requirements for UK independent schools

To apply to a UK independent school, you'll need to have a good standard of education from your own country. You won't be expected to have passed formal qualifications, but may be asked to sit the school's own entrance exam in subjects such as English and maths.

Some schools may ask students to sit entrance exams in English and maths. The common entrance exam is also used by many schools for students who enter at the age of 13.

Entry requirements for career-based and pre-university study

The qualifications you’ll need will depend on the course you want to study. Some qualifications (such as A-levels Scottish Highers and and BTEC National Diplomas) are below university level and lead directly on to higher education. Others (such as HNDs and foundation degrees) are university-level qualifications that enable you to join a degree course in the second or third year.

Example qualifications required:

  • BTEC National Diploma - good general high school education equivalent to four GCSEs grades A –C, plus IELTS 4.5-5.0
  • AS/A-levels - good general high school education equivalent to five GCSEs grades A –C, plus IELTS 4.5-5.0
  • Scottish Highers/Advanced Highers – Good general high school equivalent to six Standard Grade qualifications grades 1-3, plus IELTS 4.5-5.0
  • International Foundation Year - twelve years of school education or equivalent in your own country, plus IELTS 4.5-5.0
  • HND - qualifications equivalent to one or two UK A-levels, two or three Scottish Highers or a BTEC National Diploma or an international foundation year, plus IELTS 5.5-6.0
  • Foundation Degree - qualifications equivalent to one or two UK A-levels, two or three Scottish Highers or a BTEC National Diploma or an international foundation year, plus IELTS 5.5-6.0

 

What if you do not meet the entry requirements?

If your English language proficiency score is not high enough, you can enrol in an English language course to prepare you for further study. All British universities have English language centres on campus, or have links with English language colleges.

If you don’t meet academic requirements, there are a few options to prepare you for further study. Depending on your previous studies and the final qualification you want to study, you can enrol in secondary school or Foundation Studies.

Study Cost

Studying in the UK can cost less than you think. The course fees you pay include all the benefits that UK study brings - better English, work experience, developing career-relevant skills, living in a culturally diverse society, and making new friends and contacts. A UK education is a unique experience that you can’t put a price on

Tuition fees

International student course fees vary depending on what you are going to study in the UK and for how long. We’ve put together some information on the average cost for each type of UK course:

Your UK course fees don’t just cover lectures, seminars and practicals. You’ll also have access to:

  • College libraries and data archives
  • Extensive research resources
  • Modern computer facilities
  • Science and practical laboratories
  • Workshops equipped with state-of-the-art equipment
  • Fantastic sports facilities
  • Personal tutors and experienced, professional support services
  • Leading thinkers, practitioners, academics and researchers
  • Music rooms, film and drama studios, animation suites and other creative facilities

 

Your institution will provide you with information on how and when to pay your tuition fees.

University

Foundation Studies

£4,000 to £12,000 a year

such as university entrance, preparatory and bridging courses

Undergraduate

Bachelor Degree

£7,000 to £9,000 a year

such as courses in arts, business, economics and law

Laboratory-based Bachelor Degree

£7,500 to £12,000 a year

such as science and engineering courses

Clinical courses

£10,000 to £21,000 a year

Postgraduate

Arts and humanities courses

£7,000 to £9,000 a year

Science courses

£7,500 to £12,000 a year

Clinical courses

£10,000 to £21,000 a year

MBA

£4,000 to more than £30,000

 

UK independent school fees for international students

Independent school fees in the UK cover your course fees, accommodation and some extra-curricular activities. You should check exactly what is included with the school. You may be asked to pay extra for English language tuition.

£8,000 to £25,000 a year

 

UK career-based and pre-university course fees

AS and A-levels

£4,000 to £8,000 a year

BTECs and other vocational

£4,000 to £6,000 a year

HNC/HNDs

£5,000 to £10,000 a year

Foundation Degrees

£7,000 to £12,000 a year

International Foundation courses

£4,000 to £12,000 a year

 

English language training

varies significantly depending on the course type or institution

£200 to over £1,000 per week

Refund policies

When a visa application is refused

If your application for a student visa is refused by the British High Commission, you will receive a refund for pre-paid course fees after deduction of administration charges.

It is important to note that if BHC refuses to issue a visa to a student, for whatever reason, any written agreement between the student and an education provider no longer remains in force. BHC will write to you to say your visa has been refused. You must give a copy of this notice to your education provider and request a refund.

This means that a provider is bound by the legislation to provide a refund and cannot use a clause in the written agreement to avoid all or part of this responsibility.

Working while you study

You can make your UK study experience work even harder for your future by gaining some valuable work experience. Getting a job while you study in the UK can improve your language skills and enhance your CV

Permission to work

Before taking on your job, You need to check whether are entitled to work and how many hours you can work each week.

Your UK place of study will have a careers service to help connect you to the world of work. They will provide a wide range of help and support, including:

  • access to job adverts
  • help with writing CVs and job applications
  • tips on preparing for job interviews
  • information about what it’s like to work in the UK.

 

They will also help you get first-hand experience of the workplace, consider career choices and make professional contacts. Many UK institutions also have partnerships with local employers who want students to work for them – so they understand that you’ll need flexibility to work around your studies.

National Insurance numbers for international students

If you want to work while you study in the UK you will need to apply for a National Insurance number. National Insurance is the UK’s social insurance programme that provides payment to people who are unemployed, incapacitated or retired. Your National Insurance number is your own personal account number that ensures your contributions are properly recorded.

Tax File Numbers

You should obtain a Tax File Number (TFN) from the Australian Tax Office if you are going to work in Australia. You may also need a TFN to open a bank account. In addition to supplying your name, current address and date of birth, you may also need to supply your date of arrival in Australia, your passport and proof of enrolment.

Accommodation options and costs

 

Accommodation options which may be available to you

The options available to you will depend on your institution and your host town or city – and on your needs. Institutionally-allocated accommodation may be owned and managed by the institutions themselves, or may be owned/managed by private, commercial providers working in partnership with institutions. Either way, you can be confident that institutionally-allocated accommodation is generally of a reliable standard and you can feel secure in booking it before you arrive in the UK.

In addition, there is student accommodation run by commercial operators or landlords not working in partnership with institutions. In this sector colleges and universities play no part in the relationship between the landlord and the student. In these cases, you will need to make your own checks on the quality offered.

Accommodation available to you is likely to include some or all of the following types:

  1. Hall of Residence
  2. Shared Accommodation in Houses & Flats (Apartments)
  3. Studios/Bedsits
  4. Lodging or Family Homestay
  5. Hostels
  6. Difference Between Halls & Shared House

 

1. Hall of Residence

Halls of residence are typically purpose-built developments, occupied by a large number of students. In some halls some meals are provided and these are included in the rent (these are called catered halls). Catered halls can be a good option to help budget your money but the food may very different from the food you’re used to at home. Most halls are not catered.

Halls are normally divided into flats (apartments) but halls can also consist of a large building with many rooms off a continuous corridor with communal space provided for all residents, normally on the ground floor. Where halls are divided into flats, small numbers (eg five or six students) share a kitchen/social space, in which they can prepare and eat their own meals from food which they buy themselves.

Each student normally has a study bedroom for their own use. Some institutions and commercial providers also provide some shared (normally twin) rooms. Shared rooms are more of a feature of towns/cities where accommodation is expensive (eg London and Edinburgh) and shared rooms offer a considerable cost saving.

Most halls provide internet connectivity.

Utility costs (energy and water) are normally included in the rent and the contract will state this.

2. Shared Accommodation in Houses & Flats (Apartments)

In this type of accommodation a number of students share a house (or flat) in the community. Again students will have their own study bedroom and a shared kitchen and bathroom. En suite rooms may be available, but this is unusual. Sometimes, the student residents have a joint contract with the landlord and are jointly responsible for the rent and for keeping the property clean and tidy. Landlords will normally offer individual lets (where you are only responsible for your room and your share of the communal areas) so if you would prefer this you should ask the landlord. In this type of accommodation the rent is unlikely to include internet costs and utility charges and you will pay these directly to the provider.

3. Studios/Bedsits

A bedsit is a room which includes all facilities for living and sleeping, and sometimes for cooking, but some aspect of services, either a bathroom or kitchen, will be shared. A studio flat will include everything: sleeping accommodation, kitchen and bathroom facilities. This type of accommodation is usually for one person (but some larger bedsits and studio flats may be suitable for a couple).

If this type of accommodation is within purpose-built student accommodation, the rent is likely to include utilities and internet. If not, these costs will be extra to the rent.

Studio flats are normally the most expensive type of accommodation available to students and you should think seriously about the cost before renting. Although sharing a flat or facilities can raise issues, it is also a good way of meeting people. Living on your own in a self-contained flat can make meeting people more difficult.

4. Lodging or Family Homestay

When a student is in lodgings they live in part of a property also lived in by the owner, who may have a family. The student is expected to share the facilities along with the owner (and their family) and to fit in with the lifestyle of the owner and any house rules which they set. Some or all meals may be provided. Family homestay is a particularly important part of the London accommodation market. It is also a popular option for students under the age of 18. Many homestay providers are experienced in housing international students and in the challenges they face in living in a new country. Homestay schemes are normally run through the education institution and if you are interested in this type of accommodation you should check with your institution first.

5. Hostels

These are normally owned by charitable organisations. Some hostels provide accommodation for single students and for student couples. Hostels usually provide some meals or have cooking facilities and allow students to prepare their own food. Staying in a hostel can give you the opportunity to become familiar with the area where you are studying and this is an advantage if you want to find private accommodation later. Hostels are a particular feature of the accommodation market in London.

6. Difference Between Halls & Shared House

A summary of the differences between institutional halls of residence and living in a shared house in the private sector

 

University accommodation
(based on a single room in a shared flat of 4/5)

Private accommodation
(based on a single room in a shared house of 4/5)

Rent

May look more expensive but is likely to include some or all utility bills and possibly some other services

May look cheaper but is likely not to include some or all utility bills

Gas, water, electricity

Inclusive

£15 per person, per week (approx)

Internet

Often inclusive, but check

£2 per person, per week (approx)

Payment methods

Flexible - often a number of ways to pay

Often negotiable (eg monthly or quarterly payment terms on request)

Insurance (basic cover)

Sometimes inclusive, but check

£2 per person, per week (approx)

Contract length

Standard contract until June or September

Standard contract until June or September

Opportunity to move

Often possible to move to other university accommodation if vacancies are available

Generally not possible to change accommodation (unless you find a replacement)

Pastoral Care

Generally wardens/residential officers available

Usually no pastoral care

Flatmates

Generally not possible to choose flatmates

Possible to choose housemates

Cleaning

Waste disposal

Often there is a service to remove rubbish and clean communal areas

Bins will be provided on site, normally in a central location

Usually no cleaning service provided

Your rubbish will be collected either weekly or fortnightly by the local authority. Ask your landlord for details

Accessibility of landlord

Usually management office on site (except in 'smaller residences') and Accommodation Office on campus

Varies

Security

Usually a security presence and regular security patrols, sometimes 24-hrs a day

Generally not available

Repairs and maintenance

There may be a formal commitment to getting repairs and maintenance done within specified timescales

Varies, but if your landlord is part of a recognised accreditation scheme it is likely they will be working to agreed timescales

Booking accommodation

It is generally not advisable to enter into a contract for longer-term accommodation before you arrive in the UK. There are, however, some exceptions. For example some accommodation providers (such as Unipol Student Homes in Leeds) have an online booking system offering access to their portfolio of accredited properties. It is always worth contacting the accommodation office at your institution to see if they can recommend any such organisations that they work with. For students attending institutions without these relationships, you won’t be able to look at the accommodation and you won’t be able to get a good idea of whether the landlord is trustworthy or not. Nor will you be able to get a full and proper sense of what is available generally in the private sector.

Student Visas

'Before you begin your UK education, you may need to apply for a visa. There are different types of visa, depending on your age, and on the length and level of the course that you want to study

Child student

You can apply as a child student if you are between 4 and 17 years old. If you are between 4 and 15 years old, you must be coming to the UK to be educated at an independent fee-paying school.

Child visitor

You can apply as a child visitor if you are 17 years old or under and you want to come to the UK to do a course of study for up to six months. You will not be able to switch and apply for a child student visa while you are in the UK as a child visitor. If you want to apply for a child student visa, you must apply from the country you live in.

Adult student

You can apply as an adult student if you are coming to the UK for your post-16 education.

Student visitor

You can apply as a student visitor if you are 18 years old or over, you want to come to the UK to do a course for up to six months, and you do not want to work while you are here. You will not be able to switch and apply for an adult student visa while you are in the UK as a student visitor. If you want to apply for an adult student visa, you must apply from the country you live in.

Prospective student

You can apply as a prospective student if you want to come to the UK to help you decide which course to study or if you plan to start a course of study within six months. You will be able to switch and apply for an adult or child student visa while you are in the UK.

Student visa for Adult Student

For adult and child student visas, the UK has a points-based visa system which is designed to be objective and transparent. To apply, you need to gain 40 points. This includes 30 points for a “confirmation of acceptance for studies” from the university, college or school where you want to study.

Your chosen place of study must be on the “register of sponsors” kept by the UK Border Agency (UKBA). This register is designed to give you peace of mind that you are applying to join a bona fide institution. Find out more at the UKBA website.

The remaining 10 points comes from demonstrating that you can afford to cover all or part of your fees and living costs to study in the UK. This has been put in place to help you avoid any financial difficulties that might affect your ability to complete your studies.

For assistance in your application for a student visa, contact our office.

Changes to international student visa rules

From May 2012, you may be asked to attend an interview or take part in a telephone interview. If asked to attend an interview BHC will offer you the first available interview date.

Applying for a student visa

You can apply for your student visa only when you receive Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) from your education provider . .You will need a student visa for the whole time that you study in UK. You can apply for your student visa in person at your local visa center.

General and other student visa requirements

There are a number of general requirements that international students must meet in order to be eligible for a student visa. These include requirements relating to:

  • Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies(CAS).
  • English language proficiency.
  • Financial Statements
  • Privious Educational Documents

 

New living costs requirements

From May 2012 international students must show they have access to GBP 9000 living costs per year in London or GBP. 7200 from outside London. This new regulation will ensure that international students are able to make the most of their studies and have a safe and enjoyable experience in United Kingdom.

Visa Application Fee

A non-refundable visa application charge of Rs.46190/- applies to Tier 4 (General) or Tier 4 (Child) student visa applications.

In addition, there may be other expenses associated with your visa application, such as costs for medical examinations, police checks and the translation of documents into English (if required).